Interview with Mark Calde, Author of Bascomville

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Mark Calde is the author of Bascomville. You may remember it from his book spotlight and my review for Bascomville. Today, I am pleased to have him for an interview on Lover’s Quarrel. It’s been awesome working with him and I wish him the best in future endeavors and I hope we do get to see a sequel to Bascomville someday.

Tell us what Bascomville is about.

Bascomville is a literary romance that functions on several levels. It is the story of Max and Janice, who begin as childhood friends and gradually fall in love. It is the story of Max’s family and how he relates to them. And finally, it delves into the notion that, for better or worse, we each create our own special universe.

The characters all appear very real. Did you base any of them off people you know?

As a writer I try to be observant of the people I come into contact with, whether casually or on a more consistent basis. My characters often embody the traits I observe in others and in myself, but I avoid slavishly copying someone I know, as that hampers the creative process.

Max and Lily discuss what “normal” means. What does it mean for you?

For me, and the thesis I try to exemplify in the book, normal is what each of us make it. There is, in my view, no test-tube version of normal. It can’t be quantified or objectified. What’s normal for one person may be far out of another’s comfort range. If we all behaved in the same way and liked the same things, life would be a tremendous bore!

If we all behaved in the same way and liked the same things, life would be a tremendous bore! — Mark Calde

Out of all of your novels, which was your favorite one to write?

While each of my novels has been its own unique journey, I’d have to say that my fondest memory is of my first, Shadowboxer, a suspense novel published by G.P. Putnam’s Sons. Your first book is rather like your first kiss. It’s an experience that can’t be duplicated and remains with you forever.

What does a typical writing day look like for you? From idea to final draft, what is your writing process?

These are interesting questions because I’m rather an atypical writer. First of all, I have to know where I’m going, where the story is going to end. The road to that end doesn’t have to be totally in place but the destination does. Next come the names of the main characters. Those are very important to me and help me to visualize the characters. Also, I don’t do a lot of drafts. I prefer to think about a chapter a great deal before I write it, and I often wind up doing the actual writing in the evening. Of course, I hit dead-ends from time to time and have to backtrack, but largely my first draft of a book is about ninety percent of the finished product.

What are some of your favorite books?

My two all-time favorites that I’ve read several times each are The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand and The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho. I never fail to be inspired by the characters, the themes and the wonderful storytelling.

Keep searching for that one book that will speak to you over and over again. And when you find it, never let it go.

Are you currently working on any writing projects, or have any planned for the near future?

I would very much like to do a sequel to Bascomville. I believe Max and Janice have more of their story to tell. Also, I’m making notes on what I hope will be a young adult series. It’s something I’ve never done and I like the prospect of a challenge. We’ll see if I’m up to it!

Is there anything else you want to share with my readers?

I firmly believe that books, especially fiction, are an essential ingredient to making whatever time we have been allotted both meaningful and enjoyable. Well-written, well-plotted fiction can illuminate our lives. It can teach us, it can entertain us and it can make us think. And sometimes it can change our lives. So please, keep reading. Keep searching for that one book that will speak to you over and over again. And when you find it, never let it go.

 

What’s the one book that speaks to you over and over again? Let us know in the comments!

3 Ways to Listen to Audiobooks for Free

Audiobooks are really great for when you want to read, but you’re working with your hands. Whether you’re doing the dishes, cooking dinner, or commuting, sometimes you’re not able to hold a book. Audiobooks are great for that. But they’re even better if they’re free. So here are 5 ways you can listen to audiobooks for free.

1) Llibrivox_logoibriVox

LibriVox.org is a website with free public domain books read by volunteers around the world. They have over 10,000 works catalogued and are adding more all the time. Even if you don’t like the classic books you read in high school, you’ll find so many more interesting and amazing books to read and enjoy.

 

2) Free Audiobooks App by RB Audiobooks

This is a great app that I use quite a bit. You can either stream the books from the internet or download them for on the go. There’s a wide variety of books here, again from the public domain. Currently, I’m listening to The Amazing Interlude by Mary Roberts Rinehart through this app, and I’m really enjoying it. You can find it quickly by going to the app store and typing in “free audiobooks”.

3) Library of Public Domain YouTube Channel

There are plenty of audiobook channels on YouTube, but this one has one of the largest selections. With over 13,000 videos, there are plenty of choices for everyone.

What’s your favorite way to listen to free audiobooks? Comment below.

Book Review: Grind by Edward Vukovic

51m7qvaf84l-_sx322_bo1204203200_Genre: Contemporary, Literature

Page Count: 391 pages

Average Goodreads Rating:4.2/5 stars

My rating: 3.5/5 stars

Ziva has the ability to read fortunes in coffee grounds, passed down from her grandmother. She does it for her family and friends. But then Ziva uses her ‘gift’ for herself.

Throughout her life, her talent had been freely given to those desperate for a glimpse into destiny’s promise: love, loss, life and death, and everything else along the way.

 Ziva revels in the semiotic arts and their ability to bring joy and comfort to those she meets. But with the blessing of enlightenment comes the curse of knowing all that is toxic, harsh and flawed in the future. To tell or not to tell? When face-to-face with imploring eyes, begging to know what’s to come – are they sometimes better off not knowing?

Continue reading “Book Review: Grind by Edward Vukovic”